Author Archives: aryalegal

The lives that don’t natter: The Brahmin as a hate figure

The current hyperbolic preoccupation with race in the Anglosphere has provided an opportunity for some to link caste to race as though they are cognate phenomena of oppression. In the article at this link, it is argued that this coupling … Continue reading

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How the British got their caste law

This presentation, given at the School of Law, Queen Mary, University of London on 20 November 2019, explains how the anti-discrimination law in the UK came to include caste. It locates activism, led mainly by evangelical influence within churches, as … Continue reading

Posted in caste, caste discrimination, caste system, Christianity, colonial conciousness, conversion, cultural diversity, dalits, descent discrimination, discrimination, discrimination law, Equality Act 2010, Equality and Human Rights Commission, India, Indian law, Marianne Keppens, Orientalism, Protestant Reformation, S.N. Balagangadhara, United Nations | Leave a comment

Western Foundations of the Caste System: A discussion on Meru Media

In this podcast interview, Prakash Shah speaks to Mukunda and Racchit about the caste system and its conceptual foundations in the Western world. We discuss the idea of the caste system and how it was developed through the West’s engagement … Continue reading

Posted in Brahmanism, caste, caste discrimination, caste system, Christianity, colonial conciousness, dalits, India, Indian law, Western culture | Leave a comment

Enduring religion in the Kashmir conflict

That the conflict over Kashmir is religious seems self-evident to most people who care to talk about it. Opposing sides fundamentally agree the conflict has a religious character. US President Trump may have summed it up when he said, “Kashmir … Continue reading

Posted in Christianity, colonial conciousness, Hindus, Indian law, Islam, Islamic colonialism, Islamic law, Islamophobia, Jammu and Kashmir, Narendra Modi, Pakistan, post-colonialism, Protestant Reformation, terrorism, Western culture | Leave a comment

Western Foundations of the Caste System: a conversation for New Books in Hindu Studies

The Indian caste system is an ancient, pervasive institution of social organization within the subcontinent – or is it? Dr. Prakash Shah (Reader in Culture and Law at Queen Mary, University of London, UK) speaks to Dr. Raj Balkaran, the host … Continue reading

Posted in caste, caste discrimination, caste system, Christendom, Christianity, colonial conciousness, dalits, discrimination, discrimination law, Dunkin Jalki, Equality Act 2010, European culture, India, Indian law, Jakob de Roover, Marianne Keppens, Martin Farek, Orientalism, Protestant Reformation, Protestantism, S.N. Balagangadhara, Sufiya Pathan, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

An outcast response to the Journal of Legal Pluralism special issue on ‘States of Occupation’

The article below, ‘Humpty Dumpty’s occupation’, is based on a rejected submission I had made to the Journal of Legal Pluralism. It is my response to a special issue of the Journal of Legal Pluralism (2017, Vol. 49, No. 3) … Continue reading

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Is Myanmar destined for partition?

This article discusses a list of apparently separate developments that considered together may lead to the possible conclusion that a coordinated effort is underway to enable an argument for secession justified against the backdrop of grave violations of human rights … Continue reading

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What’s eating the United States?

Thinkers on the American left are producing diagnoses of why the United States and its political culture is more divided than united. The question, “what made the election of Donald Trump possible?” is the spark. Mark Lilla’s The Once and … Continue reading

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Caste in the time of identity politics

The reporting, both in the UK and in India, of the British Conservative government’s decision in July 2018 to repeal the UK Equality Act’s duty to incorporate caste as ‘an aspect of race’ is misleading. The dominant accounts would have … Continue reading

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Does Durkheim Enhance Our Understanding of Law and Religion?

In this lecture, given at the conference on “The Sacred and the Law. The Durkheimian Legacy” at the Kate Hamburger Center for Advanced Study in the Humanities “Law as Culture”, Bonn, 27-28. October 2015, I view Durkheim in two ways: … Continue reading

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